Put Your Money Where Your Mission Statement Is

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They say if you want to know what a person values, just take a look at his or her checkbook. (I’ve also heard a variation that says “if you want to know where a person’s heart is, look at their checkbook” – which is pretty darn close to Matthew 6:21). I guess the updated version of that would include taking a look at their bank statement, but the point is that if you want to know what matters to a person, look at how they spend their money.

The same holds true of the church. In 2000, a study by John LaRue (no relation, though that IS pretty cool… lol) showed that the average church spends about 75% of their tithes and offering on compensation, facilities, organizational fees, and administration and supplies. That leaves about 25% to do hands-on ministry.

The churches who responded to his survey had an average annual budget of nearly $300k. Since I mostly work with small and mid-sized churches, I’m more familiar with churches whose budgets average under $100,000. I would guess that the average small church spends almost half their budget on facilities and almost half on compensation and conferences, leaving about 1 or 2% for outreach and evangelism.

I’ll be the one to say it: if I’m even close to accurate, that’s a crying shame. If we value “having church” more than we value ministering to people outside our four walls, hitting the streets with tracts, going door-to-door to invite people to Christ, feeding the hungry, helping the elderly, giving clothes to those in need, then we’ve lost sight of our mission. Too many churches have mission statements that they don’t carry out. If a person just reads the mission, it sounds like you’re doing great things, but do we actually DO anything more than come to church every Sunday (or Sabbath) and sing and shout and cry for 2 hours (or 3)? I know we enjoy that. It makes us feel good. It’s what we’re accustomed to, so it feels right.Rehearsals, meetings, trainings, classes, usher board, children’s ministry… that’s all great, and God knows it has its place. But there is MORE to ministry than just what takes place in the four walls of your church building.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m not minimizing the benefits of a good worship service. I can cry and shout with the best of ’em. But we cannot – we simply cannot forget about the ones who need food, or clothes, or love, or help; the ones we don’t see on Sundays at 11. That’s what ministry is. Anybody can do church. Shucks, these days, EVERYBODY is doing church. It used to be a running joke that in Brooklyn, New York, there are churches on every corner. Nowadays, that can be said of nearly ever major metropolitan city in the US – and even in the small towns. New churches are opening every week… and few of them are doing more than just running through an order of service for a few hours, going home and coming back to do it again the next week. That’s lame. SOOOO LAME.

I challenge you pastors, leaders, and lay members to encourage YOUR local assembly to do more. Show the love of Jesus Christ by serving the people around you. Have your youth ministry rake leaves for the neighbors – for free. Instead of soliciting financial support from the community, give back to the community: wash some cars for free, this time. Adopt a widow or two. Teach people how to write resumes. Start a mentoring program for young men. Collect and distribute winter coats. Offer a free aerobics/exercise class (or if you don’t have the space, organize some walking/jogging teams).  Do a food drive AFTER Thanksgiving is over… visit the sick and hospitalized – even if they’re not members of your church. Go downtown and pass out bottles of water on a hot, summer day. Or go to the local park and give out hot dogs and soft drinks. Offer a parents’ night out to the neighbors. Host a weeknight dinner for all the families who live on the block where your church is located. It’s great to give scholarships to your HS grads, but maybe this year you can give one to some other kid who’s not a member of your church (Philippians 2:4). Instead of trying to think of new ways to get more people in the church, try to think of new ways to show more people the love of Christ, thus winning them into the KINGDOM. I Corinthians 9:19 says, “For though I am free from all men, I have made myself a servant to all, that I might win the more.You want to win souls? SERVE THEM!

I encourage all my readers, especially the pastors, to go back to the book of Acts and reflect on how church used to be… how church was designed to be. Go back to the blueprint. And while you have that Good Book open, check out Matthew 25:31-46 (a must read). Flip over to the disciples’ argument about who is the greatest, and re-read what Jesus told them about servanthood (Luke 22:25-27). Let’s reclaim the church for ministry and do what we’re assigned to do.

So the question to ponder or discuss is, does your church do church or do you do ministry?

OITC Nominated for FOUR 2011 Black Weblog Awards!

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Vote Order in the Church! for Best Faith-Based Blog, Best Writing in a Blog, Blog to Watch, and Blog of the Year!

Thanks to your support and God’s grace, Order in the Church! has been nominated for FOUR 2011 Black Weblog Awards. Yes, four! Wow.

We were nominated for:

  • Best Faith-Based Blog
  • Best Writing in a Blog
  • Blog to Watch
  • Blog of the Year

I would really appreciate your continued support! To vote for Order in the Church!, please click here or on the “Vote 4 Me” image. To spread the word, click on the Facebook or Twitter icons at the bottom of this post (or you can click the e-mail icon to send this post via e-mail).

When I started Order in the Church!, I really just wanted an outlet for the many random, but church-related, thoughts that run through my mind frequently throughout the day. As I began to write more, and the Lord began to whisper things in my ear, I realized that Order in the Church! is not just an outlet for me. So many of you have told me that you feel the same way and have the same thoughts and have the same hopes for the Body of Christ. I just can’t say how much that encourages me. I truly believe that one day, we will be able to get back to the basics of church – without the hype, without the frills, without the excessive emotionalism, without the man-made rituals and traditions. One of these days, we will once again see order in the church.

And that’s why I write. I want to help us all – in some small way – to be better administrators, better pastors, better leaders, and better members of the body.

Thank you again for reading, subscribing, forwarding, sharing, commenting, encouraging, praying, giving feedback, offering topic suggestions, telling your friends and family about the blog… thank you for your support.

~LaRue

To Vote or Not to Vote

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Today, I read a blog article titled “19 Reasons Baptists Should Stop Voting on Stuff.” I’m not sure what made the author, Brandon A. Cox, a pastor at Saddleback Church, give Pentecostals, Apostolics, Methodists, and Presbyterians a pass, but shucks, we have it bad, too – especially we Pentecostals and Apostolics!

We tend be governed by Pastoral Rule, and not by a board of deacons, elders or a presbytery. One person typically calls the shots in Pentecostal churches, so we tend not to vote on the little things like whether or not to implement casual attire for the warm summer months or whether or not to push the service time up an hour when daylight savings time ends. Shoot, many of us don’t even vote on the big things like how tithes and offerings are administered. *shrug* Okay so we definitely don’t vote as much as the Baptists – maybe that’s why Cox let us off the hook. But, we do have our share of nasty, anything-but-Godly, knock down, drag out, go-for-blood campaigns, which can easily include all the filthy elements of a typical U.S. Presidential election. We are known to get downright dirty if a pastoral position is up for grabs, and don’t let a bishop or superintendent become ill. Folks will be campaigning in the hospital waiting room before the Beloved Bishop even takes his last breath.

And I won’t even get into all the resources (money, time, and people) spent to campaign for these “ministry positions” when those resources could be spent on evangelism and outreach (which are actual Biblical mandates).

But as a friend and fellow blogger asked today, what’s the alternative? If we don’t vote in our leaders, how do we go about filling a vacant position?

I’d love to dig into what the Bible shows us about selecting (or electing) leaders, singular leadership, plural leadership, New Testament church leadership and all that good stuff. But alas, I’m on the iPad and typing on this thing is no fun… Plus, I haven’t done a great deal of research yet anyway. So how about you check out Brandon’s list (and by the way, I do NOT agree find merit with all his points), and I’ll promise to dig a little deeper soon. Fair enough?

What do you think about voting in the church? Should it be acceptable? Is it Biblical? What, if anything, do you think should be voted on? In lieu of voting, how would you propose leadership and leadership matters be decided? Let me know what you think!

  1. Voting never brings unity, it actually calls for division. Who is for and who is against?
  2. Voting is democratic – government by the people. Church should be theocratic – government by the Holy Spirit.
  3. Voting plays right to the flesh and personal preferences. We typically vote what we want or prefer, regardless of what God wants or what leaders are leading us to do.
  4. Voting gives equal weight to every member, regardless of investment in ministry.
  5. Voting leads us to believe that the majority must be right. According to some presidential elections, that obviously isn’t true (I’ll leave you to sort out which ones make my case).
  6. Voting gives the impression that a plurality of approval is the same as unity. It’s not. One deeply hurt family prevents real “unity.”
  7. Voting supersedes God’s intended order of leadership within the structure of the local church.
  8. Voting risks friendships needlessly.
  9. Voting equals leadership by polls. Since when did Jesus ever ask the audience their opinion? Even with His shepherd’s heart, Jesus never polled the sheep to find out which direction to go.
  10. Voting doesn’t work too well for Congress!
  11. Voting is man-made, there isn’t a single scriptural example. And Mattathias is not an example (Acts 1).
  12. Voting keeps us business-minded, not ministry-minded.
  13. Voting suggests the church has a political side. It’s the only time we really see power plays within God’s family.
  14. Voting is governed by rules but church is governed by relationships.
  15. Voting creates confusion and invites the opinions of 15, or 150, or 1500 viewpoints. No real problems are ever solved.
  16. Hanging chads.
  17. Democrats.
  18. Republicans.
  19. People were pretty much unanimous to crucify Jesus.

You’ve got to admit, I have at least a dozen good points, right? What’s your vote?”

Everybody Who’s in Your Corner isn’t on Your Team

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Some time ago, the Lord took me to one of my favorite passages in Ezra, and gave me a word to share with the people of God. I shared it on Facebook and forgot about it. Recently, I attended a service and the preached word came from that same passage, so I thought I’d share it here.

Ezra 4:1-5
Now when the adversaries of Judah and Benjamin heard that the children of the captivity builded the temple unto the LORD God of Israel;
 
Then they came to Zerubbabel, and to the chief of the fathers, and said unto them, Let us build with you: for we seek your God, as ye do; and we do sacrifice unto him since the days of Esarhaddon king of Assur, which brought us up hither.
 
But Zerubbabel, and Jeshua, and the rest of the chief of the fathers of Israel, said unto them, Ye have nothing to do with us to build an house unto our God; but we ourselves together will build unto the LORD God of Israel, as king Cyrus the king of Persia hath commanded us.
 
Then the people of the land weakened the hands of the people of Judah, and troubled them in building,
 
And hired counsellors against them, to frustrate their purpose, all the days of Cyrus king of Persia, even until the reign of Darius king of Persia.”

So the story here is pretty clear and easy to understand. The children of Israel were on assignment to rebuild the Temple after decades in Babylonian captivity. They developed their plan, organized laborers, laid the foundation, and were working cheerfully when the enemies of Judah (praise) and Benjamin (son of the right hand, which symbolizes authority) showed up. If it wasn’t 10:30 at night, I would dig a little bit into how there are people who hate your praise, and surely people who hate your authority. But, you get the picture so let’s keep it moving. The enemies of praise and authority tried to fit in. They could’ve just come in trying to tear things up all out in the open and blatantly, but instead, they tried to sneak in cunningly. They devised a plan. They went to the newly freed Israelites and said, “hey, we’re on the same team as you. We want to build with you. We share the same vision. Let us help you build…” Now, if this was a scene from 2011, it probably would’ve sounded a little deeper, maybe something like: “Man of God, I feel led of the Lord to help you advance the kingdom of God here in Anytown. The Lord has placed a burden in my spirit to hold up your arms as you do the labor of the Lord throughout the nations, and through you, we will go to new realms and new seasons and breakthroughs and dimensions and all the other buzz words .
 
Yeah. You get the picture. They pretended to serve the same God. Probably had the look. Walked the walk, talked the talk, knew all the lingo, gestures, timing, etc. But thank God for a discerning leader. Zerubbabel knew they were up to no good, and told them they weren’t qualified to build God’s house. Some things never change. Back then, somewhere around 537, 536 BC, the enemies couldn’t just walk away and go find another chur– temple to harass. They decided to engage in an all-out attack on these folks who just barely got free from bondage… can’t even enjoy their victory good before the enemy shows up. Yeah, so anyway, in verse 4, we see that they began to do everything they could to “weaken the hands” (discourage, demoralize, burn out, frustrate, to cause to be idle or useless) of the builders. Now, the enemies wasn’t just bothering random Israelites, they were bothering those who were building the Temple (if I were Eddie Long, this would be a good place to say “watch this, watch this.”) The Bible says that they troubled them in building! (Watch this!) Troubled: From the Hebrew “bahal“… means to disturb, to alarm, to terrify, to rush or hasten, to cause anxiety, fear, nervousness, dismay, terror… Whew. If you haven’t met the “adversaries of Judah and Benjamin” yet, you don’t even know what enemies are! Imagine just trying to do ministry. That’s all you’re trying to do is what God assigned you to do… and here comes “folks” to try to rush the timeline God gave you, trying to make you anxious, doubtful, fearful, nervous, scared… just trying to disturb you however you can to keep you from fulfilling your assignment.
 
In verse 5, the Bible says that they hired counselors (co-conspirators) to frustrate (to BREAK) the Israelites’ purpose. Yes, your enemy will go so far as to find a cohort (or what did TD Jakes call them? Comrades) to fight against you. They will build a team of comrades.  They don’t even have to be friends or like each other. They just have to be willing to work together long enough to frustrate your purpose. Whew. Y’all don’t even have to read this, it is blessing ME! Some of us complain over having to deal with it for a whole year… the Bible says these enemies worked against them for 15 years! And… (watch this…lol) they kept. on. building. Selah (pause for reflection).
 
Yes, they kept on building. Speak to me, Jesus.
 
The enemies went over their heads and wrote a letter to the king. It was a conspiracy. They went to the king and said, “King, if you let them build this temple, they’re not going to pay taxes and you’re going to lose money. They are rebellious. Look at where they come from! Check their references, King, I’m telling you. You gotta stop them! What you need to do is… I’m not trying to tell you how to be King, but… If it were ME, I would… I’m just saying, King… it’s for the sake of the people!!! The people want you to intervene. I’m just trying to help you, King. You’re going to lose the Kingdom, everything is going to fall apart if you don’t stop them… not that I’m trying to tell you how to run your kingdom… I’m just… sayin…

The moral of the story is that everyone who looks like you, sounds like you, dresses like you, and plays in your sandbox is not necessarily on your team. These enemies didn’t come with a red cape and red horns and an evil grin. They came pretending to be worshippers.  Their Plan A was to “work” right alongside the Israelites tearing down everything they tried to build without them even noticing it.  They planned to unglue what the Israelites glued, unstitch what they stitched, remove nuts and bolts, hide bricks, whisper murmurings and complaints… But when that didn’t work, they enacted Plan B and just went public with their assault. 
 
Be prayerful. Be watchful. Sober. Vigilant. Be discerning. And no matter what, keep on building. ‘Cause going back is not an option. 🙂

Note: Sound familiar? I originally published this on my Facebook page on August 31, 2010. I’m sharing it here with minor edits.

Osama bin Laden Has Been Killed. What Now?

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Last night, President Barack Obama announced that the United States of America had conducted an operation that killed Osama bin Laden, the admitted mastermind of the September 11th attacks on the American people, believed by many to be the most evil terrorist in American history.

Late last night, and into the wee hours of the morning, my acquaintances on Facebook, Twitter, and other social networking sites expressed fear, relief, joy, indifference, peace, numbness, and even sadness. One Facebook friend asked “is this the end, or the beginning?” Others questioned whether America, and specifically, President Obama would be safe from retaliatory attacks. Many news programs showed Americans celebrating bin Laden’s death, while others reflected sadly upon the events of September 11th.

Just last week, the southeast experienced an outbreak of tornadoes that, according to the federal government’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, killed 346 people (and some reputable news sources are reporting an even higher number) across eight states, which is more than any tornado outbreak in the past 75 years. Last night, President Obama announced bin Laden’s death.

A friend posed the question on Twitter, “what now?” And I began to watch the answers, many from respected church leaders, flood my Twitter feed.

I see this historic event, and the tornado outbreak before it, as yet another opportunity for the elect of God to rise up, unite, and LEAD this nation to God. The body of Christ must keep this event, and all others, in proper perspective. This is NOT the time for Christians to rejoice, nor is it the time for us to just go on with our lives as though nothing is taking place. It is also not the time for us to be afraid or anxious.

We talk so much about “advancing the Kingdom,” but when ripe opportunities present themselves for us to really roll up our sleeves, and do the WORK involved in advancing the Kingdom, we sit back and do nothing. As a Church, as a body, we sit back and do nothing. The social networking sites are full of pastors who are putting out various messages – some calling for 24 hour, round-the-clock prayer, some calling for days of fasting, some organizing services (don’t ask me who the offerings will benefit) and other initiatives, all leading in different directions. But imagine how much more powerful and effective our efforts would be if we were all in the same place, at the same time, with one accord. What if we all – every Christian in this country – fasted in the same manner, with the same spirit, on the same day(s)? What if we all prayed the same thing? What if we all shared the same goal and spoke the same “language”? What if we were all like-minded just this one time?

We, the called, aren’t called to wear titles and robes, open churches and sit in special seats. We are called to do. Called to serve. Called to act. Called to lead. This is the time for us to lead. When communities are plagued by gun violence, as my own home town continues to be, secular organizations shouldn’t take the lead in doing something about it. It should be the Church. When HIV/AIDS becomes an epidemic spreading rampantly through communities, the Church should be taking the lead. When tornadoes destroy entire towns, the Church should be taking the lead. When the high school drop-out rate near 50%, the Church should be taking the lead. It is time for the Church to rise up and act.

What now? So many Christians want to act, but are lacking solid, trustworthy, God-inspired leadership. What we need is a Moses. So many of our Moses-types are busy battling their own insecurities and fears, just as Moses himself did. Today’s leaders face the same concerns. Me, Lord? But they don’t even know my name. Me, Lord? They won’t believe in me. Me, Lord? I’m inadequate – I don’t have the credentials, the backing of a large organization, a national platform, a significant title, an endorsement… Me, Lord? I have the wrong accent, I’m inarticulate, I’m uneducated. Me, Lord? I’m an outcast. Like Moses, the ones most qualified by God to lead this cause are the ones most humbled by the daunting task of uniting a very disjointed body, giving direction to a people who are too self-promoting to take on the role of a follower and not a leader, leading people who are too ego-driven to submit to authority, and embracing the spotlight, subjecting themselves to criticism, complaints, abandonment, and betrayal.

And of course, the best known leaders are preoccupied with lustful desires for money, power, fame, and other unGodly exploits.

So where does this leave us? Shall we continue to operate as disjointed, disunited members of this body, accomplishing little more than burning energy? Or shall we unite and advance the real Kingdom? What say you?

95 Theses to the Modern Evangelical Church

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I’m sitting here with my sweats and pink Yankees cap on, sipping on a Caramel Macchiato (with extra caramel) from Starbucks, taking in my surroundings, observing the calm and return to normalcy after a fatal series of tornadoes swept through the southeast less than 24 hours ago.

It was my intention to take a “vacation” from OITC this week, just to relax my brain a little bit and replenish my “tank” (my fuel gauge was getting low ;-)). But then, I came across this article, and got a recharge of energy! Although I can’t say I agree with each of the 95, I do find most of them to be accurate and noteworthy, and at the very least, worthy of discussion. It’s always a blessing to find that there are people who share your passion and perspective on the things that mean something to you. Restoring God’s order to the church means something to me, and apparently, I’m not alone. In the last week or so, the Lord has blessed me with some really amazing Kingdom connections. I can’t begin to tell you how blessed I am to have made the acquaintance of men and women of God who are also committed to sounding the alarm as a warning to the body of Christ that we’re missing the mark consistently, and heading in the wrong direction, with great speed and fervor.

I’m so excited to share this with you. Thanks to Pastor Saiko Woods for sharing the link.

Please comment below and let me know what you think.

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95 Theses to the Modern Evangelical Church by Greg Gordon

I believe many need to hear these truths and they are shared in the humility of my weakness and lack in my own Christian Life. May all of these lead people to experience the person and work of the Lord Jesus Christ and to proclaim His Gospel clearly and accurately. May God in His mercy come and revive, reform and renew North American Christianity for His glory alone. “May the Lamb of God receive the reward of His sufferings in our lives today!”  – Greg Gordon

1. The “church” at large has forgotten that the chief end of man is to glorify God. (Rom 16:27; 1Cor 6:20; Mt 6:9; 1Cor 10:31)

2. Christians ignore most of the methods, practices and principles found in the book of Acts. (Acts 2:42,44; Acts 2:46; Acts 2:38)

3. Many treat “church” like any other social club or sports event that they might attend. (Acts 2:46; Heb 10:25; Acts 1:14)

4. We’ve made Christianity about the individual rather than the community of believers. (Rom 12:5; 1Cor 12:12; 2Tim 4:16)

5. In most “churches” the priesthood of all believers isn’t acknowledged and the role of pastor is abused. (1Pt 2:9; 1Cor 12:12; Eph 4:11-13)

6. The “church” as a whole has lost the concept of their being grafted into the promises given to Israel. (Rom 11:15, 17-18, 20, 25)

7. There needs to be a recovery of teaching the whole counsel of God, especially in expository form. (Acts 20:27; 1Tim 4:6, 2Tim 2:15)

8. We take it too lightly that we have the blessing and honor of having God’s Scriptures in our possession. (Ps 119:16; Acts 13:44; Neh 8:9)

9. There has never been more access to the Word of God, yet so little reading of it. (1Tim 4:13; Neh 8:1-3; Ps 119:59)

10. Some read the Scriptures to attain knowledge, but do not practice what they read. (Jam 1:22; Mt 7:21; 3Jn 4)

11. Worship has become an idol in many “churches.” The music often resembles that of the world. (Amos 5:23; Phil 4:8; 1Jn 5:21)

12. The world is shaping the views of the “church” more than the “church” shaping the world. (Rom 12:2; Mt 5:13; 1Cor 1:22-23)

13. The “church” spends more money on dog food than on missions. (2Cor 9:6; Lk 21:2; Acts 4:34-35)

14. We take lightly the cost of discipleship laid out by Jesus Christ and do not deny our lives. (Lk 14:33; Lk 14:26-27; Mt 8:19-20)

15. There is a lack of true discipleship and making others to be obedient disciples. (Mt 28:20; 2Tim 2:2; 2Tim 2:14)

16. Many subscribe to the error that parts of life are to be spiritual while others are to be secular. (1Pt 4:2; Col 3:3; 1Jn 2:6)

17. Modern Christians often find Jesus’ command to sacrifice and serve abhorrent. (Phil 2:21; Jam 3:16; Rom 12:1-2)

18. Self disciplines in the Christian life such as fasting and praying are considered legalistic. (2Tim 2:21; 2Tim 1:8; Mt 6:17)

19. Little thought and contemplation is put towards the lostness of men, the seriousness of the Gospel. (Phil 3:8; Gal 2:20; Heb 10:34)

20. We are living with an epidemic of cheap grace with flippant confession and shallow consecration. (Lk 14:28-30; Lk 14:26; Jam 4:8)

21. Since the inception of the Church, the Gospel had the requirements of repentance and discipleship. (Acts 2:38; Lk 14:26; Jn 8:31)

22. Now forgiveness is offered without repentance, discipleship without obedience, salvation without sanctity. (Heb 10:29; 4:11; Lk 13:24)

23. Introspection, counting the cost, godly sorrow over sin, are all foreign to many in the “church.”(Acts 2:37; Ps 119:9; Heb 6:1-2)

24. The modern church loves itself more than its neighbor. (1Cor 3:3; Gal 5:13; Phil 2:3)

25. The church must repent of its idolization of personality, and of business principles. (2Cor 2:17; 1Cor 3:5; 1Cor 12:23)

26. Many elders and pastors of the “church” sadly are fleecing the flock to supply their own wants. (Jn 10:12-13; 1Pt 5:2-3; Rev 2:15)

27. The qualities most in demand in today’s pastorate are frequently foreign to the Scriptures. (1Tim 3:2-3; 1Tim 3:5; 1Tim 1:5-7)

28. The professionalization of the pastorate is a sin and needs to be repented of. (2Cor 11:13; Gal 3:1; Gal 2:6)

29. There must be repentance for the ambitious desire and idolization of the celebrity pastorate. (3Jn 9; Jer 17:5; 1Cor 12:22)

30. Pastors must trust the Spirit, not statistics. (2Sam 24:1; 1Cor 1:25; Rom 8:14)

31. Modern day prophets are being stoned by criticism and neglect. (2Tim 4:3-4; Gal 1:10; Jer 1:7-8)

32. God’s prophets are ill-treated and shunned by most “christians” who consider them too extreme. (Jer 6:10; Isa 6:9-10; Gal 4:16)

33. The prophets prophesy falsely, priests rule by their own power; and my people love to have it so. (Mt 24:4, 11-12; 1Cor 1:19, Jude 8 )

34. There are many false gospels being preached from pulpits in our day. (2Cor 11:4; Gal 1:8-9; Jude 16)

35. There is an epidemic of a “mock” salvation message. It is correct in doctrine, but false in reality. (2Cor 3:6; 1Jn 5:11-12; Rom 8:9)

36. A salvation that does not make men holy is trusted in by a deceived multitude. (Jude 4; Rom 8:1; Rom 6:17-18)

37. There is a needed perseverance in the truths of the Gospel without unbelief. (Eph 1:1; Heb 6:11-12; Heb 10:26-27)

38. A great need is to see “christians” become saints in actual experience. (1Jn 2:29; Col 3:5-8; Tit 3:8)

39. Many professors of religion are forbidding people to be a part of the holy body of Christ. (Mt 23:13; Ps 119:1-2; 2Pt 1:3-4)

40. Preaching has become all about the happiness of man and not the glory of God. (Jn 6:26; Rom 4:20; 1Pt 4:11)

41. Preachers give smooth words to entice men, yet very few give any words of correction or rebuke. (Jer 6:14; Pro 1:23; 1Tim 5:20)

42. Run from gospels that focus on our success and prosperity in the name of Jesus Christ. (Jn 2:16; Acts 20:33; Jer 6:13)

43. Run from gospels that focus on self-improvement. (1Tim 6:5; Heb 12:14; Jam 4:14)

44. Run from churches where men, and not Christ, are glorified. (Col 1:18; Jude 25; Jn 16:14)

45. Run from churches where there is no Bible, no cross, no mention of the blood of Christ. (1Pt 1:18-19; Eph 3:13; Rev 1:5)

46. Run from churches where the worship leaves you cold, where there’s no sense of God’s presence. (1Cor 5:4; Ps 80:14-15; Jer 12:11)

47. Run from churches where you’re comfortable in your sin. (1Cor 14:25; Heb 10:30-31; Heb 4:13)

48. Run from churches that use the pulpit of God for a personal agenda. (Jude 10-11,19; 3Jn 9)

49. Run from those who preach division between races and cultures. (Jam 2:4, Gal 3:28, Rev 5:9)

50. Run from ungodly, spasmodic movements and endless empty prophesying. (Jer 5:13; 1Cor 14:33, 1Jn 2:16)

51. Run from preachers who tell mostly stories and jokes. (Eph 5:4; Tit 1:8; 2:12)

52. Run from those that are only after money, who use one gimmick after another to get your money. (2Pt 2:3; 2Cor 12:14; 1Cor 9:18)

53. The phrase “accept Jesus as your personal Saviour” is not found in the Scriptures. (Rom 10:9-10; Col 1:13; Acts 26:20)

54. Evidence of true conversion does not seem important to modern day Christians. (1Jn 2:6; 1Jn 4:17; Mt 7:20)

55. Thousands of sinners think of God as having only one attribute: Love! But they continue in sin. (Rom 1:18; Acts 5:11; Ps 2:12)

56. “God loves you and has a wonderful plan for your life!” has hindered true evangelism. (Rom 3:19; Acts 26:18; Phil 3:18-21)

57. A Gospel of love and grace only, without the law of God being preached. This is a doctrine of Satan. (2Tim 4:3-4; Rom 2:4-5; 3:19)

58. There has clearly arisen a careless mixture of 20th century reasoning with God’s revelation. (Col 2:8; Rom 1:25; Gal 1:6)

59. Decisionism and the “sinner’s prayer” has been a major cause of false conversions in the “church.” (2Pt 2:1-2; Eph 2:4-5; 2Cor 5:17-18)

60. Many will be surprised to hear Jesus say, “I never knew you, depart from me.” (Mt 7:22-23; 1Cor 6:9-10; Gal 5:19-21)

61. Men have taken the place of the Holy Spirit in confirming men in their supposed salvation. (1Jn 2:3-5; 2Ths 1:8; Gal 6:12-15)

62. The doctrine of hell and eternal suffering is something little grasped by most professing “christians.” (Mt 13:42; Jam 5:1; Ps 9:17)

63. The judgment seat of Christ is perhaps one of the most neglected topics in the modern pulpit. (2Cor 5:10; Rom 14:10; 1Cor 3:13)

64. The second coming of Christ needs to be re-instated as the church’s general thrust and burden. (1Jn 3:2-3; Col 3:4-6; 1Ths 4:14-17)

65. The church has lost the fear of God and has over emphasized the love of God. (Heb 12:28-29; Lk 12:5; Heb 10:31)

66. The church has left evangelism to a few trained professionals. (Acts 8:1,4; Acts 4:29; Rom 10:14)

67. Repentance is considered a one-time act in modern evangelism rather than a way of life. (Rev 3:19; Heb 12:17; 2Pt 3:9)

68. The Lordship of Jesus Christ is something that is not taught in many pulpits. (Acts 2:36; 1Cor 12:3; Rom 6:18)

69. Many in “churches” are not open to correction, church discipline or rebuke. (1Cor 5:5; 1Cor 11:31-32; Heb 12:7-9)

70. Some preach salvation as a theory instead of persuading men to come to Christ. (Jn 5:40; Col 1:28; 2Cor 4:5)

71. There has been a loss of the fullness and majesty of the gospel. (1Tim 1:11; Jude 25; Rom 15:29)

72. There is little mention of sin or the depravity of man from “church” pulpits. (Jn 3:20; Gal 5:19-21; Eph 5:5)

73. Covetousness, consumerism, and coddling of the world’s goods does not appear wrong. (Jer 22:17; 1Jn 2:15-16; 1Tim 3:3)

74. Little is made of the resurrection of Jesus Christ in churches or in evangelism. (1Cor 15:14-15; Acts 4:10, 33)

75. The “church” has relied more on technology than God. (Zech 4:6; 1Cor 1:21; 2:4)

76. The prayer meeting is considered one of the least important meetings in the “church.” (1Tim 2:1; Acts 4:31; Phil 4:6)

77. Pastors have never prayed less than they do in the “church” today. (Jer 10:21; Phil 2:21; Eph 6:18-19)

78. Very few are waiting on God for His direction and purpose for His Church. (Eph 1:11; Ps 37:7; Isa 40:31)

79. The “church” has many organizers, but few agonizers. (Phil 3:18-19; Rom 9:1-3; Jer 9:1)

80. We need to have the gifts of the Spirit restored again to the “church.” (2Tim 4:2; 1Cor 14:39; 1Cor 12:31)

81. A serious, sober, self-controlled Christianity is very seldom found or preached. (2Pt 3:11; 1Pt 4:7; Jude 3)

82. The “church” at large has forgotten how to pray. (1Jn 3:22; Acts 6:4; 1Ths 5:17)

83. Many “churches” are more dependent on tradition than the leading of the Holy Spirit. (Mk 7:13; Acts 16:6; Acts 13:2)

84. Multitudes of professors preach and teach: that you cannot be freed from sin. (Rom 16:18; Rom 6:1-2; 2Pt 2:1)

85. The Apostles and Christ always preached the possibility to walk free from the bondage of sin. (Tit 2:11-12; 1Pt 1:14-16; Rom 6:19)

86. Sinners are not saved to sin, but rather, saved to holiness and good works. (Rom 6:13; Eph 2:10; 2Pt 3:14)

87. Cheap grace means the justification of sin without the justification of the sinner. (2Tim 2:19; 1Pt 4:17-18; 2Tim 3:12)

88. A baptism of holiness, a demonstration of godly living, is the crying need of our day. (1Tim 6:3; 2Ths 3:6; 2Ths 2:13)

89. Many are confused about obedience and the good works that are readily mentioned in the Scriptures. (Tit 3:8; Jn 10:32; Rev 3:15)

90. Little emphasis is put on the plan of God to make us like Jesus Christ in “churches.” (1Pt 1:14-16; 1Jn 2:6; 1Pt 4:1)

91. Christ did not die on the cross to obtain a worldly “church” but for a “glorious Church.” (Eph 5:27; Tit 2:14; Col 4:12)

92. Christ does not come into an unregenerate and impure heart as many contemporary theologians say. (2Cor 5:17; Mt 5:8; Eze 18:31)

93. A holy Church is God’s blessing to the world; an unholy “church” is God’s judgment upon the world. (Mt 5:14,16; Eph 4:1; 1Ths 2:12)

94. If Christianity is to make any headway in the present time, it must be proved to be more than a theory. (2Ths 3:6-7; 1Ths 4:1,11-12)

95. Unbelief has gagged and bound us as risen Lazarus! We need release in this final hour! (Heb 3:12-14; 1Cor 3:21-23; Heb 11:6)

Nominate Order in the Church! for the 2011 Black Weblog Awards

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Greetings! The Black Weblog Awards have been recognizing the best Black bloggers since 2005. This year, for the first time, the awards will be presented at a Live Awards Show in Los Angeles, California. Order in the Church! is eligible for nomination in several categories, and your support would mean the world to me! 

Click to nominate Order in the Church!

I am seeking nomination in the following categories:

  • Best Faith-Based Blog
  • Best New Blog
  • Best Writing in a Blog
  • Blogs to Watch

Please click on the BWA image on your left and complete the quick and simple form (it probably won’t take you longer than 30 seconds – seriously). Copy and paste this URL: http://orderinthechurch.com into each category listed above, and press the “submit” button at the bottom of the page. Yep. That’s all. (Now, if you REALLY want to be a doll, you’ll forward the link to all your friends and family, and ask them to nominate OITC as well. :-)) Nominations end on May 7th. Oh, and one last favor to ask: Will you PLEASE use the Facebook and Twitter buttons at the bottom of this post to share this page with all your FB friends and Twitter followers? I would SO appreciate that.

I started OITC to get some things off my chest and clear up some “traffic” in my mind. As I’ve said before, I was once challenged to stop complaining about the church and DO SOMETHING about it. I didn’t know what somebody like me could do… until I realized that Order in the Church! is my way of “doing something.” This blog is my contribution to the cause. My goal is to share this exhortation with as many as I can to start conversation about this all over the country. The Lord’s Church simply does not reflect what He designed it to be, and it’s time we stop ignoring it and start fixing it. The Black Weblog Awards is one sure way to bring attention to the cause. If you believe in this message (or if you just like me :-)), please nominate OITC today.

Click here to learn more about the Black Weblog Awards.

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